Photography and Human Rights

by valrac4_a3kqdy
© Charles Moore, Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama, United States of America, May 3, 1963. Reproduction from the Black Star Collection, Ryerson University. Courtesy of the Ryerson Image Centre.

© Charles Moore, Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama, United States of America, May 3, 1963. Reproduction from the Black Star Collection, Ryerson University. Courtesy of the Ryerson Image Centre.

The Ryerson Image Centre in Toronto will be presenting four new exhibitions on human rights on January 23. On view through April 14, Human Rights Human Wrongs looks at 300 images from the Black Star Collection and the text of the 1948 Universal Declaration on Human Rights to consider whether advocacy photography helps or hinders human and civil rights progress. Alfredo Jaar’s The Politics of Images and Clive Holden’s Unamerican Unfamous also are being presented through April 14. Alfredo Jaar’s work examines politics and the connection between ethics and aesthetics by highlighting recent genocides, famines and epidemics. Clive Holden questions ideas of fame and success in his multimedia exploration of 100 “unfamous” people appearing in iconic images in the Black Star Collection. Open through March 10, Dominic Nahr’s Captive State presents photographs taken during the artist’s trips to southern Somalia during the famine.

Ryerson Image Centre will also offer tours, panel discussions, talks and other events to further explore the themes of these exhibitions and related ethical questions. On January 24 at 7 p.m., the Ryerson Image Centre and the Ryerson University School of Image Arts will present “The Organ That Weeps. Photography and Violence,” a Kodak Lecture by Human Rights Human Wrongs Curator Mark Sealy. Other events listed here.

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